I’m on Twitter, again, #PoorPeoplesCampaign, and a Veterans Day letter against tax cuts for the rich

After almost 4 years I decided to give Twitter another try. I’m at @MatthewPHoh if you’d like to follow. I do interviews on a few radio and TV shows each week and so I figure Twitter might be a good, and simple, way to share those appearances.

With the assistance I’ve gotten from the doctors and the staff at the Durham VA Hospital, I also feel I am much more capable in handling the deluge of information that comes from Twitter and social media. An overabundance of information is something that easily overwhelms me cognitively and emotionally because of my TBI, Neuro-cognitive Disorder and PTSD. So let’s see how this works for me. I’m confident I’ll be able to handle it due to the training I’ve gotten from the VA to manage, adjust to and cope with the various issues in my brain. 🙂

A couple of weeks back I took part in the fifth installment of The Gathering, which is a call for the moral revival of our society by Repairers of the Breach and led by Reverend William Barber and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove. You can see an edited version of my interview with Jonathan below. Here is a link to the entire event, which included some pretty amazing singing and one, if not the best, anti-war speeches I’ve heard in the last eight years by Reverend Nelson Johnson. Reverend Johnson comes on at just about the one hour mark.

Finally, for Veterans Day, and yes I know that was already two weeks ago, hence my getting on Twitter to be maybe a little more timely, my name was on a letter sent out by Win Without War urging support for legislation introduced by Representative John Lewis. Representative Lewis’ legislation would not allow tax cuts for the rich until the trillions of dollars in debts, obligations and responsibilities for our wars are paid. The text of the letter is below and you can add your name to my petition supporting Representative Lewis’ amendment and calling on Congress to honor our veterans by accounting for the human, moral and financial costs of war.

Wage Peace.

$5.6 trillion, with no end in sight. That’s the cost of America’s wars since 9/11.

But as a Marine who served in Iraq, I don’t need a price tag to tell you about the cost of our wars for veterans like me. I’ve seen for myself the amputations, traumatic brain injuries, post traumatic stress disorder and moral injury that all lead to massively disproportionate levels of suicide, depression, substance abuse, domestic violence and homelessness in veterans returned home from war. And I’ve witnessed the human cost of our wars beyond our borders, in Iraq where I was stationed and for millions around the world.

Today, Veterans Day parades will celebrate the bravery of servicemembers, and I will be remembering those who were alongside me overseas. But before Cold War hysteria took over, November 11th was Armistice Day — a day for peace. The original Armistice Day marchers, veterans who survived the killing fields of the First World War, carried banners declaring “Never Again.” Imagine if we had listened to those veterans. Instead, our country continues to pour troops into stupid, bloated, and deadly wars.

That’s not honoring or respecting veterans. That’s putting war profits and reckless ideologies over our lives. Please join me in supporting Rep. John Lewis’ call to honor our veterans by accounting for the human, moral, and financial costs of war.

$5.6 trillion by next September works out to $310 billion per year to prop up our endless wars. That’s $23,386 per taxpayer per year. Slice it however you want, it’s an incomprehensibly massive number. And instead of asking ourselves if a single penny is worth it, we just keep freefalling into gargantuan war debt.

As for the spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical costs of my time at war — we won’t ever pay those off. Neither will the friends I remember today who died for a country that won’t acknowledge the cost of their loss. Neither will our families and communities who continue to shoulder the burdens of our service long after we leave the battlefield.

That’s why Rep. John Lewis is speaking up to demand a public, national conversation on war financing. His amendment to Trump’s tax bill would prohibit cutting taxes on the rich — a loss of revenue that would add right onto our pile of war debt — until we get our troops out of Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria and eliminate the war deficit gobbling up our budget.

Add your name to support Rep. Lewis’ amendment and ask Congress to address the costs of war.

Thank you for all you do,

Matthew Hoh, Iraq War veteran


“The War Economy is Killing our Nation’s Spirit”

I would go farther than that and say that our war culture and our society’s militarism is killing our Nation’s Spirit, just as it is killing people, the environment and our future both at home, in the United States, and across the planet.

Tonight, I’ll be with Reverend William Barber and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove in Raleigh at The Gathering, the monthly meeting of Repairers of the Breach and the Poor People’s Campaign. This month Veterans For Peace, Iraq Veterans Agains the War and Code Pink are partners and I’ll be speaking. You can listen online or if you are in Raleigh you can join us.

Below is the announcement for tonight’s event:

Tax payers in the United States have spent nearly $4 Trillion for wars since 2001 – money that should have been used to transform our nation.

Just $1 Billion of our bloated military budget could pay for 12k elementary school teachers, 7k infrastructure jobs, 100k headstart spots for children, and 30k scholarships for university students. The moral question we must put before America is: What will make us safer? More and more and more money for building the mother of all bombs, money for jobs, education, healthcare, and infrastructure? We must choose community and peace over chaos and greed, recognizing that to fight against the war economy is to challenge the policies that advance poverty, and suppress democracy.

This Sunday, Nov. 5 at The Gathering, we’re partnering with Veterans For Peace, Iraq Veterans Against the War, and CODEPINK to hear from people affected by militarism around the world on how we can join the struggle for peace.

If you’re in North Carolina: RSVP here to join us this Sunday, Nov. 5 from 6-7:30pm ET at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh.

If you can’t make it in person: Watch the livestream this Sunday beginning at 6pm ET on our website or Facebook. Make sure you share the stream on social media so the #PoorPeoplesCampaign can reach more people!

The Gathering is a new movement resource by Repairers of the Breach, live on the first Sunday of every month in North Carolina and available via livestream and podcast. It’s co-hosted by us, Bishop William J. Barber II, Pres. & Sr. Lecturer of Repairers of the Breach; and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Director at School for Conversion. The Gathering aims to equip communities with resources for faithful reflection and public action on moral issues through an hour of storytelling, music, interviews with community organizers and impacted people, and a powerful call to join the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.

We hope to see you at The Gathering this Sunday, Nov. 5 in North Carolina or online via the Repairers of the Breach livestream!

If you have any questions, please contact Rev. Erica Williams, Repairers of the Breach National Social Justice Organizer (ewilliams@breachrepairers.org).

Forward Together!

Bishop William J. Barber II
President, Repairers of the Breach

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove
President, School for Conversion

P.S. Did you miss last month’s powerful Gathering on climate justice? You can watch the video or listen to the podcast here.


I also strongly recommend Reverend Barber and Jonathan Wilson-Hargrove’s book, The Third Reconstruction: How a Moral Movement is Overcoming the Politics of Division and Fear.

Wage Peace!

Why I am going to #NoWar2017: War and the Environment

World Beyond War’s #NoWar2017 conference is next weekend, September 22-24, in Washington, DC at American University. A concurrent event will be held in Berlin, Germany, where I was fortunate to take part from last year. I’ve put up this short video to explain why I am going to DC to attend the conference:

There is still space available at the conference and I really encourage folks to attend if they can, as the list of speakers is truly and absolutely fantastic:

Medea Benjamin, Nadine Bloch, Max Blumenthal, Terry Crawford-Browne, Alice Day, Lincoln Day, Tim DeChristopher, Dale Dewar, Thomas Drake, Pat Elder, Dan Ellsberg, Bruce Gagnon, Kathy Gannett, Will Griffin, Seymour Hersh, Tony Jenkins, Larry Johnson, Kathy Kelly, Jonathan King, Lindsay Koshgarian, James Marc Leas, Annie Machon, Ray McGovern,  Rev Lukata Mjumbe, Bill Moyer, Elizabeth Murray, Emanuel Pastreich, Anthony Rogers-Wright, Alice Slater, Gar Smith, Edward Snowden (by video), Susi Snyder, Mike Stagg, Jill Stein, David Swanson, Robin Taubenfeld, Brian Terrell, Brian Trautman, Richard Tucker, Donnal Walter, Larry Wilkerson, Ann Wright, Emily Wurth, Kevin Zeese. Read speakers’ bios.

And special guest: Chelsea Manning.

The fellowship and solidarity that occurs at events like this is why I keep going to these sorts of things, besides, of course, for the opportunity to learn, grow and develop as a peacemaker. I always come away from a conference like this stronger, more balanced and greatly inspired, because of the company I have just been with.

Information on the conference can be found here. It’s a pay what you can event, and there is a ride share and lodging message board to help you find a way to DC and then find a place to stay once you are there.

If you can’t join us in DC next weekend, the conference will be live-streamed via World Beyond War’s Facebook page, so please attend virtually, and, if you are able, please consider providing a donation so that World Beyond War can continue to do its work (I’m an advisory board member).

I hope to see you in DC! Wage Peace!