Borat and the Cycle of Hate and Violence

How quickly is the cycle of hate and violence exposed and exploited? Could what we see happening in countries all around the world, when the cycle of violence turns neighbors against each other so viciously and so bloodily, happen here? Often when talking about this all too common and easily occurring phenomenon I refer to the below video where British comedian and satirist Sacha Baron Cohen‘s Borat character whips a live and unscripted crowd in Arizona into a frenzied passion of anti-Semitism. It is horrifyingly fascinating and shows, at our base level, we are no different than people elsewhere.

From Wikipedia:

The Borat character has been accused of anti-Semitism but Baron Cohen, himself an Orthodox Jew, has explained that the segments are a “dramatic demonstration of how racism feeds on dumb conformity, as much as rabid bigotry.” Borat essentially works a tool. By himself pretending to be anti-Semitic, he lets people lower their guard and expose their own prejudice,” Baron Cohen explained to Rolling Stone. Baron Cohen, the grandson of a Holocaust survivor, says he wishes in particular to expose the role of indifference:

When I was in university, there was this major historian of the Third Reich, Ian Kershaw, who said, ‘The path to Auschwitz was paved with indifference.’ I know it’s not very funny being a comedian talking about the Holocaust, but it’s an interesting idea that not everyone in Germany had to be a raving anti-Semite. They just had to be apathetic

 

  
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Songs From A Friend

From songwriter and new friend Mary Ann Daugherty, a few songs of suffering, healing and peace. Thank you Mary Ann. If anyone would like to contact Mary Ann about performing or recording these songs, please let me know.

Back in South Bend
Lyric by: Mary Ann Daugherty

Verse
In the land where lightning strikes up from the ground
A private named Joey is the latest man down
An unlucky step, a mine he didn’t see
Cost him both legs below the knee

His brothers in arms rally after the blast
They call in for help and they tie the wounds fast
They’re shouting his name but he needs more time
To return from the hiding place deep in his mind
Continue reading

  
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Thoughts on Yemen and the Middle East

Here are some of my thoughts on Yemen and our foreign policy in general in the Middle East:

Institute for Public Accuracy:

“You don’t have to be an expert on Yemen, the Middle East, Islam or foreign policy in general to realize that what is occurring in Yemen is similar to what is occurring throughout the Greater Middle East. Decades of American interventionist policy, that can be at best be described as inept meddling, with roots going back to the overthrow of the democratically elected government of Iran in 1953 and the establishment of the Shah’s authoritarian police state, have created, fostered and sustained sectarian, ethnic and religious conflicts that have birthed repressive regimes, extremist terror groups and genocidal civil wars throughout the Middle East. Yemen is one more glaring example of failed American policy in the Middle East, perhaps all the more tragic and absurd as Yemen was cited as an example of success by President Obama when he authorized his seventh bombing of a Muslim nation, Syria, last year.”

Inter Press News Service:

“I don’t know if Yemen will split in two or not. [But] I believe the greater fear is that Yemen descends into mass chaos with violence among many factions as we are seeing in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Syria, all nations that have been the recipient of interventionist U.S. foreign policy.”

“Based upon the results from decades of U.S. influence in trying to pick winners and losers in these countries or continuing to play the absurd geopolitical game of backing one repressive theocracy, Saudi Arabia, against another, Iran, in proxy wars, the best thing for the Yemenis is for the Americans not to meddle or to try and pick one side against the other.”

American foreign policy in the Middle East, he said, can already be labeled a disaster, most especially for the people of the Middle East.

“The only beneficiaries of American policy in the Middle East have been extremist groups, which take advantage of the war, the cycles of violence and hate, to recruit and fulfill their message and propaganda, and American and Western arms companies that are seeing increased profits each year,” said Hoh, who has served with the U.S. Marine Corps in Iraq and on U.S. embassy teams in Afghanistan and Iraq.

  
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